Yellow Foot Prints Forums  
 

Go Back   Yellow Foot Prints Forums > Web Links > Marine Historical sites

Marine Historical sites Marine Corps history can be found here

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rating: Thread Rating: 5 votes, 5.00 average. Display Modes
  #1  
Old 05-05-2009, 12:07 PM
Cpl Miller's Avatar
Cpl Miller Cpl Miller is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Sacramento, Ca
Posts: 2,547
Viet Nam Historical files

This site contains the official records, documents, files and photographs from the United States Marine Corps' participation in the Vietnam War from 1960 to 1975. All documented USMC operations and activities which occurred in Vietnam are searchable by unit or command and can be reviewed, printed, copied or downloaded.

Feel Free To
Drop In For A Visit


__________________
Semper Fi

Cpl Miller 1964 - 1970 USMC
gmiller@yellowfootprints.com
www.militarycommcenter.com
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 05-28-2009, 04:06 PM
Snoopy69
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Hum, Seems there out for the money...in my book I fought there it was my war it ought to be all free open info to all of us Marines who were there.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 07-07-2009, 08:26 AM
camp49's Avatar
camp49 camp49 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 1
Try this. No charge.

http://www.vietnam.ttu.edu/virtualarchive/index.htm
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 09-12-2009, 06:37 AM
Jimg0610's Avatar
Jimg0610 Jimg0610 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Westlake, Oh
Posts: 9
You can get the Command Chronologies/After Action Reports on cd in pdf form from the Gray Research Center at no cost to you. It took about 10 days for me to
receive the CDs after I requested them over the phone.



Gray Research Center
Attn: Archives
2040 Broadway Street
Quantico, VA 22134



Phone: (703) 784-4538 (Ms Martha Roberson – very helpful – she is the one I requested my copies of the AA/CC from).
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 03-15-2010, 07:47 AM
Groper Groper is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: S.E.Wisconsin
Posts: 1
Jim is correct...

Ms. Roberson is outstanding in her helpfulness! Two minutes on the phone, two weeks to wait, and it's all good! Thanks much for the tip, Marine! SF!
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 05-03-2010, 05:23 AM
jawhed's Avatar
jawhed jawhed is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: milford pa.
Posts: 3
http://www.recordsofwar.com/vietnam/usmc/USMC_Rvn.htm try this site check your unit on the left and click. SEMPER FI!!!!!
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 04-27-2011, 01:59 PM
stan wahl stan wahl is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: seattle
Posts: 76
snoppy69....I agree with you 100%.Semper Fi brother
DaNang 1967 1968
__________________
stan wahl
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 05-07-2013, 06:58 PM
MARINE42's Avatar
MARINE42 MARINE42 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: wi
Posts: 1,183
Vietnam: The Battle For Historical Truth

Vietnam: The Battle For Historical Truth

Quote:

Exclusive: Richard Botkin, on 38th anniversary, seeks to set record straight about war

Those of us old enough to recall the date April 30, 1975, will forever remember those final newscasts from Saigon being overwhelmed by invading North Vietnamese infantry and armor, images of multitudes futilely attempting to join the American exodus, shots of U.S. Navy ships steaming offshore crowded with refugees and flight decks awash in helicopters being pitched into the abyss of the South China Sea – the sinking aircraft a metaphor to many for the tremendous waste of American blood and treasure. And since that dark sunset on that day the wounds that were the Vietnam War would never quite heal or be remembered in proper perspective.

“No event in American history is more misunderstood than the Vietnam War.

“It was misreported then, and it is misremembered now.”


Read more at

http://www.wnd.com/2013/04/vietnam-t.../#SPmAL42MXsyI CEZw.99
__________________


Admiration of the Nation We’re the finest ever seen And we glory in the title Of United States Marines.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 12-07-2014, 04:25 AM
MARINE42's Avatar
MARINE42 MARINE42 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: wi
Posts: 1,183
One Veteran Shares What It Was Like to Be Surrounded by the North Vietnamese for 77 Dreadful Days

One Veteran Shares What It Was Like to Be Surrounded by the North Vietnamese for 77 Dreadful Days


Recon teams from Bravo Company, 3rd Recon Battalion at Khe Sanh had been reporting large enemy movements long before the siege started. Many had experienced contact with elements of the NVA for some time, but the higher-ups seemed to be in denial about the size and intent of the enemy. By the end of December, Khe Sanh was observing blackout orders at night.

On January 21, 1968 at 5:00 a.m. the base was hit with its first heavy bombardment from NVA artillery and mortar batteries. 50,000 well-trained, well-equipped NVA had surrounded the base and had begun a siege that would go on for the next 77 days.


Hitting the Ground Running

I arrived at Khe Sanh as a 20-year-old, fresh-in-country Corpsman assigned to Bravo, 3rd Recon. When myself and another new Corpsman were flown into Khe Sanh on a Caribou cargo plane, we were told that the plane was not going to stop to unload, that it would taxi in to the loading area and we were to run off the back ramp as it kept rolling and into bunkers beside the airstrip. That’s what we did and then watched while it continued back out to the runway to take off as fast as it could to avoid being hit by incoming mortars.

That was my introduction to the war. Little did I know what lay ahead. The NVA would begin firing their mortars as planes landed. They would hit a big C-130 during the siege, and one large 53 Seaking medivac helicopter, killing several Marines and wounding many more.

From the 21st of January to the 9th of April, the Marines at Khe Sanh would endure daily artillery and mortar barrages. The NVA would also probe for weaknesses along our perimeters and would even try to tunnel under the base. Corpsmen from Bravo Company would often be called upon to take their stethoscopes and listen to metal stakes pounded into the ground to see if we could hear any sounds that would imply tunneling beneath the base. There were about 5,000 Marines and Army of the Republic of Vietnam (ARVN) troops on the base when the siege began.



“One of the men, thinking that others may not yet have assembled, suggested that we wait for the others. We were told that we were it.”

Bravo, 3rd Recon had 110 men on January 21st. On April 9th when the siege had been lifted, our Company Commander gathered us together for a photo for historical purposes. We were issued new, clean fatigues to put on. We had not showered or bathed fully in 77 days. We had lived underground in bunkers of our own making in the red earth of that part of Vietnam. Everything we wore was covered with that red dust. The letters I wrote home during the siege still have that red dirt smudged into them.

We put those newly issued fatigues on over our dirty bodies and began to gather together for that photo. Our CO began to read off all of the names of those who were present. There were 42 gathered together there. One of the men, thinking that others may not yet have assembled, suggested that we wait for the others. We were told that we were it.

At the end of the siege only 42 of the original 110 were able to walk onto the one helicopter that would take us away from that place where we had struggled, fought, and survived together for so long. Nineteen of our men had been KIA as a result of the constant and accurate artillery and mortar fire. 49 had been wounded and evacuated either to the rear or to hospitals in Japan, the Philippines, or the U.S.


No Rest for the Weary

We were supposed to be taken back to Quang Tri to be reunited with the full battalion, but for some reason, we were flown to Phu Bai. We would not be able to get further transportation to Quang Tri until the next day. It was late in the day, we were exhausted, dirty, and benumbed. But we were not alone. Our 1st Recon brothers at Phu Bai gave us soap and towels and opened their facilities to us so that we could take our first showers in months. They fired up the ovens in the mess tent and cooked us our first real meal since January 21st. We had been living on C-rations and Kool-Aid alone during the siege.

An artist's tribute to the fallen men of 3rd Reconnaissance Battalion at Khe Sanh.

That part of the war was over for us. We were told when we got to Quang Tri that we would be given a month to get back into condition, and re-equip ourselves before we would be going back out on the recon patrol missions that we had been trained to do, to become once again the “eyes and ears” of the 3rd Marine Division. That would not be the case, of course. We were back at it within a week.

At 20 years of age these kinds of experiences have a way of tattooing themselves into the memory. You are no longer 20 years old, you are 40. You face your own mortality in ways that are not normal, that are intense, immediate, and certain. Your dependence on your brothers for mere survival is complete. When you endure something like that you form a brotherhood like no other. Being with the men that I went through these things with again this past week has been one of the most moving experiences I have had in a long time.


Good Marines

We are old men now in our 60s and 70s. Some of us are struggling with the health issues that come with age. Many have died and our numbers are growing smaller every year. We are all slower, grayer, heavier than we were back then, but when we get together we are young men again, enjoying our shared memories, laughing about the crazy things we did, and mourning those who died, and who we remember as they were back then.

I am, of course, thankful that I came home, that I was able to marry a woman who has loved me for over 40 years now, to have been given the gift of two beautiful daughters and three wonderful grandchildren. I was able to enjoy a meaningful and purposeful career and to build a good life. I am thankful for those men who gathered in Sparks, Nevada this past week to spend time together again, to enjoy the camaraderie of that singular brotherhood again. I am glad, too, that we were able to remember those who died. The experiences of war never leave us. We endured our struggles with PTSD to recover from our wounds and our memories. We overcame to varying degrees, and we got on with our lives. But we never forget.

Thank you to all my brothers in Bravo Company and to all our brothers from who fought with 3rd Recon Battalion, 3rd Marine Division in that war long ago. Thanks to all who have served in all of our wars. We did our duty, and we did it with honor. Our honor and respect goes out to all those who died and to their families. Semper Fi!

You were all good Marines.

Read more at

http://blog.theveteranssite.com/khe-...KlcqUzeswSr.99
__________________


Admiration of the Nation We’re the finest ever seen And we glory in the title Of United States Marines.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 04-26-2015, 06:04 PM
Catman Catman is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 23
You are right about that big Jim..I am 68 and have to have a pace maker done next week..I keep on passing out..All is ok now..I feel great....Give my best to Joan...Take care brother...
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 04-30-2015, 05:05 AM
MARINE42's Avatar
MARINE42 MARINE42 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: wi
Posts: 1,183
Vietnam: Photos that defined the war

Vietnam: Photos that defined the war


http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/...AARDHP#image=8
__________________


Admiration of the Nation We’re the finest ever seen And we glory in the title Of United States Marines.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 04-30-2015, 01:46 PM
Catman Catman is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Posts: 23
Brother Jim:..Those are some good photo's..Brings back good and bad memories..I remember when I came back from R&R..I found out my friend I went to high school with was killed in combat..I couldn't eat or sleep..Just broke my heart..Once in awhile I will have a bad dream..Scares the hell out of my wife..But she understands..One of my5th grade classes ask me if I would talk about the Viet Nam war for the class project..I told them do not ask me if I killed anyone..They all agreed..I broke down and cried my ass off..Everyone of those kids came up to me and gave me hugs..I have known all these kids since kindergarden..They will all graduate this June,and go on to the 6th grade..They all want me there,and I wouldn't miss that for anything...
Give my best to Joan..Take care my friend..Semper Fi Brother........Stan from Seattle..
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Viet Nam Corpsman KIA listing Cpl Miller Obituaries Updates 0 03-27-2012 05:43 PM
Viet Nam 66/67, The Cpl Rysavy story Cpl Miller Announcements/Updates 0 05-29-2011 08:08 AM
Veterans Affairs to Reopen Gulf War Vets' Files MARINE42 Open Channel 0 02-26-2010 08:41 AM
Marine Corps Historical Society San Diego Cpl Miller Marine Historical sites 0 05-02-2009 03:23 PM
Women Marines historical event.. Cpl Miller Announcements/Updates 0 03-09-2008 11:29 AM


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 04:02 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright & Copy 2006-2019, Yellow Foot Prints, All Rights Reserved
You Rated this Thread: