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As any Marine who has tipped a beer in one of the base clubs knows ANYTHING can and usually does happen at an Enlisted Club.

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  #21  
Old 06-05-2010, 04:28 PM
Ed DeVoe Ed DeVoe is offline
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26 years since I stood on the famed yellow footprints. How time flys. Did four years active duty 83-87. One of Reagan's Marines. Also did some reserve time. Got out as a Sgt. of Marines with 10 years of service. I miss it.

Sgt. Ed DeVoe
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  #22  
Old 06-06-2010, 10:47 AM
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gkmoz gkmoz is offline
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42 Years

Come August 23,2010 it will be 42 years since I was on the "yellow footprints" and yes it was 2 or 3 in the morning ! Gunny Skinner was my first senior drill Instructor( got orders for Nam )2nd week there. Then We had SSGT Vallancourt SGT T.Fagan and good ole SGT R.Kay. It was in the high 90s to low 100s for most of aug/sept then hurricane season ! Oy ! and finally it was Oct. and on my way to Gieger. absolutely loved Camp Lejuene. And of course I spent the next 19 months at Pendleton ! But that is how it goes in the "green Machine".
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  #23  
Old 06-07-2010, 05:00 AM
silverdollar silverdollar is offline
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It has been 56 years for me. PI 2ed bn May 19, 1954 to Aug 6 1954.

Lived on 2ed deck of wooden barracks, senior DI was Sgt. Flynn.

PS, There were no yellow footprints.
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  #24  
Old 06-09-2010, 05:20 PM
stan wahl stan wahl is offline
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I joined the Marines on the 120 day delay program,right out of high school. June 2010 will be 44 years for me.I still know my service number by heart,and some of my general orders.That's about it
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  #25  
Old 06-12-2010, 07:10 AM
Dick Shewmake Dick Shewmake is offline
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Good Morning All,Dick Shewmake here,I have a question for all .As I read the different post on YFP and read the stories of the men who served a question come to mind.Some people myself included, got of the Corps at the end of their first enlistment,but some stayed in longer 8-10 years.They were usually E-5 and above and left half way to a pretty fair retirement,WHY??.I can understand,marriage not wanting to move around so much with family,kids an school etc. I ran into a man who served over nine years made E-6 and then changed his mind and got out, I ask him why and he said he wanted a change his life style? Go figure, any imput from you would be appreciated. Just wondering what other answers are out there among the readers.Thank You Dick Shewmake 06-12-10 8:10am
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  #26  
Old 06-12-2010, 07:37 AM
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For me,

It was 1968, Tet was running hot and heavy in country. I was on Okinawa in supply attached to the 1st Marine Division out of Da Nang. Shit was hitting the fan all over the country as you Nam vets may remember.

Got called into the SgtMajor's office for my re-enlistment interview. He say's, hey we'll give you money and a promotion to Sgt if you'll re-up. I had six months left on my 6 year emlistment and all I could think of was getting my ass killed. With four more years, and not knowing how long the war was going to go on I KNEW I'd be assigned to Nam at least for two tours.

At that time I had a new wife and a young son and the thought of leaving them behind just didn't set well with me.

From 1965 until late 67 we all signed the volunteer list that came out every month to go to Nam. I remember talking with my buddy about how safe it would be to be assigned to Da Nang becasue it was such a large base. The extra money ($35.00 combat pay) was almost a full months pay at the time.

To make a long story short they took my best friend, two weeks after arriving in country they (Marine Corps) assigned him to some far reaching hill top as the supply Sgt. Within a week they got overrun and his ass got hit six times with an AK 47. I rememebr him calling me after six months in the hospital and telling me that our thinking about being save didn't pan out. THAT made up my mind real fast about getting out. Now I will say, if the Corps decided to send me into country I'd have grab my shit in a minute to do what I was trained to do.

But I had a choice, and to this day I'm glad I'm still around to see my kids and grandkids grow up. It's sad I can't say the same thing for the 58,000 that didn't make it back.
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  #27  
Old 06-12-2010, 08:12 AM
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GunnySan GunnySan is offline
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Well, Dick, in my case i almost got out at the end of my 4 year hitch as a Sgt (E4 at the time). Then I felt I was having too much fun, so I shipped over for 6 more. After 22 years, it was beginning to be less and less fun. I decided not to make it a career.
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  #28  
Old 10-18-2010, 08:05 PM
tripledog tripledog is offline
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Always late, but heres my story.

I was in the group that went to nam as military advisors. We were shot at, but could not shoot back. Fact is they wouldnt ALLOW us to have ammo.


Anyway, after 14 months of that shit over there in the Pacific, I came back to Santa Ana and every three months, I had that great reenlist sermon. I continually agreed to reenlist (if you did not, you went on Mess duty). On the one month left date, I was called in to sign the papers. I asked one question of the Colonel. "Will I have to go back overseas and if so, how long?"

His reply " We will guarantee you 12 months in the U.S. after you reenlist, since you have been back 10 months now". Like many, I had a wife and 2 small kids at the time. I told him right then and there, NO FRIGGIN WAY !

I will forever remember his words, "You will go back home, and eat beans the rest of your life then".

I have made it a point to eat steak almost every night and succeed at every thing I have tried. Thank you Colonel ! Your comment put the grit in my stomach to make dam sure I did better than beans !
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  #29  
Old 10-20-2010, 06:22 PM
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May of this year was 40 years ago for me and yes I remember it was at night when arrived and about 3am when we hit the rack and 2 hours later was up and attem doing P/T in front of the Quonset Huts at MCRDSD, then ran to Chow Hall, wow what a time, would do it all over again though if I could.
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  #30  
Old 10-24-2010, 10:40 AM
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45 years and counting. April 1st, 1965 doing the yellow footprint routine at MCRD San Diego. Has it really been that long?
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  #31  
Old 10-24-2010, 11:12 AM
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Hey marine65

Let's go for Oct 1964, seeeeeeeeeeems like yesterday. Ha
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  #32  
Old 10-25-2010, 01:14 PM
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Talk about getting old

Went to my 45th high school class reunion over this last weekend. I didn't know they had a graduating class for dropouts, but apparently they did. ha ha
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  #33  
Old 10-25-2010, 09:31 PM
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MARINE42 MARINE42 is offline
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april 1960 51+ years for me and yes we got at mcrdsd at night
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  #34  
Old 10-26-2010, 12:07 PM
silverdollar silverdollar is offline
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56 years for me, May 19 1954 2ed bn 2ed deck. no yellow footprints. don`t remember plt # , graduated Aug 6 1954.
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  #35  
Old 10-27-2010, 12:24 PM
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In my Marine Corps........

There were no yellow footprints when we got off the bus at Recruit Receiving Parris Island in 1958. Also, in my Marine Corps, we used Kiwi USMC Dark Brown shoe polish on our leather and black polish was prohibited. Our brass was real brass, no Anodized brass, that we had to take the protective coating off so we could shine it with Brasso. When a Marine went off base in civilian clothes, blue jeans were prohibited.
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  #36  
Old 10-27-2010, 01:11 PM
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That;s right about the Corps back in the 50's. Even the Pendleton Commissary had strict rules, no children under a certain age were allowed in. I had to stay in the car with my two (1 and 2 yrs. old) while my wife shopped. I believe there was a dress code for women also. Ah, the good old days.
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  #37  
Old 10-28-2010, 04:35 AM
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Did I mention that patent leather (AKA: Corfram) shoes were prohibited and they had to be dark brown? When the Corps switched to black shoes, KIWI discontinued manufacture of their USMC Dark Brown shoe polish. I wish I had bought a couple of cans to save as they probably are collector items today.
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  #38  
Old 10-28-2010, 05:09 AM
rmeunier1 rmeunier1 is offline
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Smile Getting old

Thanks guys again for the history lessons. I've been monitoring these discussions going back and forth, and find it interesting how things have changed through the years. During the late 80s' Corfram shoes were very popular, and in wide use. (I guess I am still a kid when matched up to you guys.) Have a great day. Semper Fi / Regina Meunier
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  #39  
Old 10-28-2010, 05:39 AM
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One thing that has impressed me over the years is, whether you served in China prior to WWII or served in Iraq/Afghanistan in recent years, you are considered a Marine. Whether you were an officer or enlisted, you are considered a Marine. Whether you are female or male, you are considered a Marine. Whether you are a combat Veteran or served in peacetime, you are considered a Marine. After being in the Marine Corps League for a number of years, it impressed me that most members feel that way.

I met a three star General a number of years ago. In our conversation, I respectfully called him "General". He told me, since I was no longer active in the Corps, to just call him "Marine" as that was what he was first and foremost.
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  #40  
Old 10-28-2010, 06:19 AM
rmeunier1 rmeunier1 is offline
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Well said Jack. I believe most marines will agree that the most coveted title we ever "claimed" was that of United States Marine, in spite of whatever path we may have taken in civilian life. It is that bond that we have with each other. There are no "ex-marines". I have a bond with co-workers that have served in the Corps. A fellow correctional officer that I work with daily has a completely different Marine Corps experience than I, (He was part of the Marine detachment on the USS Hunley, a submarine tender, in Charleston SC, during the mid 80s'). But we work well together, and have a bond that was forged because of our Marine Corps service. Also, as we draw near to the Marine Corps birthday, what other branch of the service celebrates it's birthday each year? The pride in having served in the Corps will never go away. Semper Fi / Regina
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